LISBON

The New Eldorado of Hipster Chic

(scroll down for more)

LISBON

The New Eldorado of Hipster Chic

(scroll down for more)

PAY 30% NOW

This reservation will be instantly confirmed upon payment of the Booking Deposit. Nothing else will be charged from your Credit Card or PayPal account.

PAY 70% LATER

Prior to your arrival you will receive a secure e-mail containing a payment request regarding the unpaid balance of the reservation.

PAY 30% NOW

This reservation will be instantly confirmed upon payment of the Booking Deposit. Nothing else will be charged from your Credit Card or PayPal account.

PAY 70% LATER

Prior to your arrival you will receive a secure e-mail containing a payment request regarding the unpaid balance of the reservation.



Discover Portugal’s greatest hidden gem

The city of Lisbon offers spectacular natural beauty, wondrous architecture and a vast history. From its perch on the steep hillsides above the Rio Tejo, it is Portugal's star attraction, filled with majestic monasteries, gothic cathedrals and quaint museums.






Set across a series of hills overlooking the broad estuary of the Rio Tejo (River Tagus), Lisbon’s stunning location and effortless beauty immediately strike most first-time visitors.






The city of Lisbon offers spectacular natural beauty, wondrous architecture and a vast history. From its perch on the steep hillsides above the Rio Tejo, it is Portugal's star attraction, filled with majestic monasteries, gothic cathedrals and quaint museums.


Set across a series of hills overlooking the broad estuary of the Rio Tejo (River Tagus), Lisbon’s stunning location and effortless beauty immediately strike most first-time visitors.


It’s an instantly likeable place, a big city, with a population of around two million, but one that remains human enough in pace and scale to be easily taken in over a long weekend. That said, many visitors visit again and again, smitten by a combination of old-world charm and cosmopolitan vibrancy that makes it one of Europe’s most exciting cities.







Visitors will travel through a fascinating mishmash of the traditional and cutting edge: chequered-tiled bars full of old-timers supping brandies adjacent to boutiquey clubs pumping out the latest sounds.






Tiny “tascas” (small bars) with bargain menus scrawled on boards rubbing shoulders with designer restaurants eyeing the latest Michelin awards, and tiny stores that wrap handmade products in paper and string overlooking gleaming shopping malls.




Visitors will travel through a fascinating mishmash of the traditional and cutting edge: chequered-tiled bars full of old-timers supping brandies adjacent to boutiquey clubs pumping out the latest sounds; tiny “tascas” (small bars) with bargain menus scrawled on boards rubbing shoulders with designer restaurants eyeing the latest Michelin awards, and tiny stores that wrap handmade products in paper and string overlooking gleaming shopping malls.







It’s a great place to explore on foot: get off the beaten track and you’ll find atmospheric neighbourhoods sheltering aromatic pastelarias (patisseries), traditional shops, and shuttered houses faced with beautiful azulejo tiles.






Getting around by public transport can be fun in itself, whether you’re cranking uphill on one of the city’s ancient trams, riding a ferry across the Rio Tejo, or speeding across town on the metro, whose stations are decorated with adventurous contemporary art.





It’s a great place to explore on foot: get off the beaten track and you’ll find atmospheric neighbourhoods sheltering aromatic pastelarias (patisseries), traditional shops, and shuttered houses faced with beautiful azulejo tiles. Getting around by public transport can be fun in itself, whether you’re cranking uphill on one of the city’s ancient trams, riding a ferry across the Rio Tejo, or speeding across town on the metro, whose stations are decorated with adventurous contemporary art.



Lisbon boasts excellent museums: from the Gulbenkian, with its amazing collection of arts through the ages, to the Berardo, whose modern paintings are the envy of Europe, via the Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, the national gallery, with top Portuguese and European masterpieces.


Europe’s most affordable capital


Europe’s most safe & affordable capital

Should city life begin to pall, take the train out to the beautiful hilltop town of Sintra, whose lush wooded heights and royal palaces comprise a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Alternatively, the lively resorts of Estoril and Cascais are just 30 min. away, with the best beaches lying south of the city, along the Costa da Caparica.


3-day crash course to Lisbon

  • Day One

    1. Baixa
    Head down main Rua da Augusta and explore the lively streets and cafés of the Baixa grid. With around 40 hotels and guesthouses, this is also the tourist epicentre, whose needs are served by a range of cafés, restaurants and street entertainers. Praça do Comércio sits to the south, with Praça da Figueira and Rossio to the north, the latter having been the city’s main square since medieval times.

    2. Chiado & Bairro Alto
    The historical neighbourhoods of central Lisbon are perfect for visitors to the Portuguese capital to experience for themselves. Chiado & Bairro Alto are the most characterful and attractive neighborhoods in the city, boasting boutiques and bars, where people meet in an eclectic and multicultural atmosphere.

    3. Tram #28
    The most charming way to tick off a few sights, the wooden tram 28 rumbles through Lisbon’s prettiest and most historic streets. Starting at the foot of Bairro Alto, the vintage carriage trundles through the shopping districts of Baixa and Chiado before lurching and labouring past the churches and castles on the cobbled hills of the Alfama and Graça neighbourhoods.

    4. Castelo de São Jorge
    The winding medieval streets of Lisbon’s most ancient neighbourhood, Alfama, twist up to the city’s Moorish pinnacle. The dusk-orange walls of the ancient castle date back to the ninth-century and lord over the city, being visible from almost every street.

    5. Alfama
    East of the Baixa, the streets climb past the city’s ancient cathedral, or Sé, to the dramatic remains of the Castelo de São Jorge and East of the castle lie two of Lisbon’s most prominent churches, São Vicente de Fora and Santa Engrácia. The districts around the castle – Mouraria, Santa Cruz and particularly the Alfama – represent the oldest and most atmospheric parts of Lisbon. Down on the riverfront, Santa Apolónia, the international train station, is situated in a revitalized area that boasts the glitzy Lux club and cruise ship terminal, while a little further east lies a historic steam pumping station and a fascinating tile museum.

    6. Museu do Fado
    Set in the renovated Recinto da Praia, a former water cistern and bathhouse, the Museu do Fado provides an excellent introduction to this quintessentially Portuguese art form. It also has a good restaurant. The museum details the history of fado and its importance to the Portuguese people

  • Day Two

    1. Museu Calouste Gulbenkian
    One of the 20th century’s great philanthropists, Armenian Calouste Gulbenkian, left much of his art and historic artefacts to his favoured city, Lisbon. The museum set up in his honour now houses one of Europe’s most epic collections. Look out for priceless Hellenic vases, ancient Chinese porcelain and paintings by Rembrandt, Monet and Van Dyck. There’s also an affiliated modern art museum opposite.

    2. Parque Eduardo VII
    The steep, formally laid out Parque Eduardo VII was named to honour Britain’s King Edward VII when he visited the city in 1903. Its main building is the ornately tiled Pavilhão dos Desportos (Sports Pavilion), long ear-marked for much needed renovation. North of here is the main viewing platform which offers commanding vistas of the city as well as Ferris wheel during the summer months. Two huge, rambling “estufas” lie close by. Set in substantial former basalt quarries, both are filled with tropical plants, pools and endless varieties of palm and cactus. Of the two, the Estufa Quente (the hothouse) has the more exotic plants; the Estufa Fria (the coldhouse) hosts concerts and exhibitions.

    3. Mosteiro dos Jerónimos
    This imperious 15th-century Manueline monastery was built to commemorate Vasco da Gama’s “discovery” of India. The main attraction is the delicate Gothic chapel that opens up on to a grand monastery, in which some of Portugal’s greatest historical figures are entombed.

    4. Berardo Collection
    In this unique collection of modern you can enjoy some of the world’s top modern artists, though not all of the vast collection is on display at the same time. Depending on when you visit, you may see Eric Fischl’s giant panels of sunbathers; Andy Warhol’s distinctive Judy Garland; and Chris Ofili’s Adoration of Captain Shit, made with genuine dung. Portugal’s Paula Rego is well represented – The Past and Present and The Barn are particularly strong. Francis Bacon, David Hockney, Picasso, Míro, Man Ray, Max Ernst and Mark Rothko also feature, along with various video artists.

    5. Torre de Belém
    A symbol of maritime Lisbon, this Byzantine and Gothic tower stands out over the mouth of the Tejo, guarding the entrance to the city’s harbour. Reached via a walkway raised out of the water on timbers, the tower is filled with intricate stonework and has wide Atlantic views.

  • Day Three

    1. Sintra
    The aristocratic hill town to the west of the city is a Neverland of fairytale palaces, manicured floral gardens and wild woodlands. The train to Sintra departs from Rossio station every 20 minutes, takes about 40 minutes and costs €2.15.

    2. Cascais/Estoril and beyond
    These neighbouring beach towns are the best of the city’s seaside suburbs. Both are destinations in themselves. Lovely coves of sand lick along the coast between the two towns, which are connected by an Atlantic-front promenade. The region’s best beaches (Adraga, Guincho and Grande) are found on the coastal road north, beyond Cascais. From Cais do Sodré station, the coastal train to Cascais and Estoril leaves every 20 minutes, takes about 40 minutes and costs €2.15.




3-day crash course to Lisbon

  • Day One

    1. Baixa
    Head down main Rua da Augusta and explore the lively streets and cafés of the Baixa grid. With around 40 hotels and guesthouses, this is also the tourist epicentre, whose needs are served by a range of cafés, restaurants and street entertainers. Praça do Comércio sits to the south, with Praça da Figueira and Rossio to the north, the latter having been the city’s main square since medieval times.

    2. Chiado & Bairro Alto
    The historical neighbourhoods of central Lisbon are perfect for visitors to the Portuguese capital to experience for themselves. Chiado & Bairro Alto are the most characterful and attractive neighborhoods in the city, boasting boutiques and bars, where people meet in an eclectic and multicultural atmosphere.

    3. Tram #28
    The most charming way to tick off a few sights, the wooden tram 28 rumbles through Lisbon’s prettiest and most historic streets. Starting at the foot of Bairro Alto, the vintage carriage trundles through the shopping districts of Baixa and Chiado before lurching and labouring past the churches and castles on the cobbled hills of the Alfama and Graça neighbourhoods.

    4. Castelo de São Jorge
    The winding medieval streets of Lisbon’s most ancient neighbourhood, Alfama, twist up to the city’s Moorish pinnacle. The dusk-orange walls of the ancient castle date back to the ninth-century and lord over the city, being visible from almost every street.

    5. Alfama
    East of the Baixa, the streets climb past the city’s ancient cathedral, or Sé, to the dramatic remains of the Castelo de São Jorge and East of the castle lie two of Lisbon’s most prominent churches, São Vicente de Fora and Santa Engrácia. The districts around the castle – Mouraria, Santa Cruz and particularly the Alfama – represent the oldest and most atmospheric parts of Lisbon. Down on the riverfront, Santa Apolónia, the international train station, is situated in a revitalized area that boasts the glitzy Lux club and cruise ship terminal, while a little further east lies a historic steam pumping station and a fascinating tile museum.

    6. Museu do Fado
    Set in the renovated Recinto da Praia, a former water cistern and bathhouse, the Museu do Fado provides an excellent introduction to this quintessentially Portuguese art form. It also has a good restaurant. The museum details the history of fado and its importance to the Portuguese people

  • Day Two

    1. Museu Calouste Gulbenkian
    One of the 20th century’s great philanthropists, Armenian Calouste Gulbenkian, left much of his art and historic artefacts to his favoured city, Lisbon. The museum set up in his honour now houses one of Europe’s most epic collections. Look out for priceless Hellenic vases, ancient Chinese porcelain and paintings by Rembrandt, Monet and Van Dyck. There’s also an affiliated modern art museum opposite.

    2. Parque Eduardo VII
    The steep, formally laid out Parque Eduardo VII was named to honour Britain’s King Edward VII when he visited the city in 1903. Its main building is the ornately tiled Pavilhão dos Desportos (Sports Pavilion), long ear-marked for much needed renovation. North of here is the main viewing platform which offers commanding vistas of the city as well as Ferris wheel during the summer months. Two huge, rambling “estufas” lie close by. Set in substantial former basalt quarries, both are filled with tropical plants, pools and endless varieties of palm and cactus. Of the two, the Estufa Quente (the hothouse) has the more exotic plants; the Estufa Fria (the coldhouse) hosts concerts and exhibitions.

    3. Mosteiro dos Jerónimos
    This imperious 15th-century Manueline monastery was built to commemorate Vasco da Gama’s “discovery” of India. The main attraction is the delicate Gothic chapel that opens up on to a grand monastery, in which some of Portugal’s greatest historical figures are entombed.

    4. Berardo Collection
    In this unique collection of modern you can enjoy some of the world’s top modern artists, though not all of the vast collection is on display at the same time. Depending on when you visit, you may see Eric Fischl’s giant panels of sunbathers; Andy Warhol’s distinctive Judy Garland; and Chris Ofili’s Adoration of Captain Shit, made with genuine dung. Portugal’s Paula Rego is well represented – The Past and Present and The Barn are particularly strong. Francis Bacon, David Hockney, Picasso, Míro, Man Ray, Max Ernst and Mark Rothko also feature, along with various video artists.

    5. Torre de Belém
    A symbol of maritime Lisbon, this Byzantine and Gothic tower stands out over the mouth of the Tejo, guarding the entrance to the city’s harbour. Reached via a walkway raised out of the water on timbers, the tower is filled with intricate stonework and has wide Atlantic views.

  • Day Three

    1. Sintra
    The aristocratic hill town to the west of the city is a Neverland of fairytale palaces, manicured floral gardens and wild woodlands. The train to Sintra departs from Rossio station every 20 minutes, takes about 40 minutes and costs €2.15.

    2. Cascais/Estoril and beyond
    These neighbouring beach towns are the best of the city’s seaside suburbs. Both are destinations in themselves. Lovely coves of sand lick along the coast between the two towns, which are connected by an Atlantic-front promenade. The region’s best beaches (Adraga, Guincho and Grande) are found on the coastal road north, beyond Cascais. From Cais do Sodré station, the coastal train to Cascais and Estoril leaves every 20 minutes, takes about 40 minutes and costs €2.15.



Y01
Y02.jpg
Y03
Y04
Y05
Y06
Y12
Y11
Y10
Y09
Y08
Y07
Y13
Y14
Y15
Y16
Y17
Y18
Y24
Y23
Y22
Y21
Y20
Y19